Posts Tagged“revision”

I Wanna Be a Real Book!

As I slowly teach myself to #CelebrateEverything, when I find myself reaching a writing milestone, I look for ways to mark and celebrate my place on the writing journey. In 2014, although I had drafted many picture books and had started many manuscripts, I had yet to complete a novel-length story. For me, it was a personal goal to complete a YA-length first draft and when I did, I took it to an office supply store and had it comb-bound into a notebook of sorts. I deliberately bound this first draft in landscape mode to allow myself a wide margin.…

Recently, I have been swept away by the tidal wave that is The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up, a book by Marie Kondo that has worked its way through my circle of friends. Although I have to admit to skimming my way through this philosophical book about purging oneself of Things, the core principles have been incredibly helpful to me as I work my way through the vague and vast stash of stuff that I have and hold onto in my physical space. According to Kondo, we should hold each object in our hands and have a tactile experience, asking…

Middle Earth in the North. This file has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. This applies worldwide.

At the LA SCBWI conference, I attended a great session on Revision by Jordan Baker, executive editor at Walden Pond Press and Balzer + Bray (HarperCollins Children’s Books). He gave an excellent talk that spoke to me, particularly as I was in the throes of what I was hoping was the final revision of my manuscript before querying. First and foremost, Baker acknowledged that revision was much more difficult and challenging than drafting. (Yes!!! That’s how I felt! Even though that’s not how it seemed when I heard other writers talking about their works in progress. The first draft was…

Walt Disney, image for non-commercial reuse

  One of the things I never expected when I transitioned into writing was the sheer number of difficult days that are involved in the writing process. When I first thought I wanted to become a full-time writer, I was most familiar with the days or moments when the stories ideas flow, when the words sing in my mind’s ear, when it feels like the world of writing is the Happiest Place on Earth. O! The awakening! Years ago, when I was working in innovation, I learned about a model that Walt Disney was said to have used in approaching…

Don Reilly/The New Yorker published on heidimkim.com with permission from Condé Nast Collection

  An astute beta-reader recently cautioned me to watch out for clichés. As with all feedback, I mulled over this for a bit and then went back to my manuscript. At that point, I was in that murky state of mind where I had reread the words so much that it seemed like every word needed to be changed. I became paranoid. Is this scene a cliché? How about this line? This phrase, this dialogue? What isn’t cliché? I had the unsettling realization that my cliché alarm was not as calibrated as it probably should be. As I was trying…